Japanese yakuza crime boss complains Covid-19 has affected profits

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A boss of one of Japan’s organised crime groups has confessed that business has taken a hit during the pandemic. The groups, known as yakuza, are known for making money through illegal means such as gambling and drug trafficking but also oversee legitimate businesses.

One such endeavour is running pop-up food stalls during festivals and events, which have largely been cancelled or downsized due to Covid-19. An unnamed yakuza boss told the Daily Shincho newspaper that this stream of income had become ‘completely impossible’ to maintain during the pandemic. ‘We usually make the most money selling to folks visiting shrines at the year’s end and New Years, but this year cause of Covid-19, it’s become completely impossible.a hand holding a cell phone: A boss of one of Japan's organised crime groups has confessed that business has taken a hit during the pandemic. The groups, known as yakuza, are known for making money through illegal means such as gambling and drug trafficking but also oversee legitimate businesses. Pictured: A retired yakuza crime boss, bearing customary tattoos [Stock image]a tray of food: One legitimate business overseen by the gangs is running pop-up food stalls during festivals and events, which have largely been cancelled or downsized due to Covid-19 [Stock photo] One legitimate business overseen by the gangs is running pop-up food stalls during festivals and events, which have largely been cancelled or downsized due to Covid-19

‘Compared to previous years, our profits are only one-third of what we usually make. The number of operating food stalls has shrunk because of government anti-Covid-19 measures, and in addition to that, the crowds visiting shrines have gone thinner,’ the boss said. Soranews24  explained that unlike in other Asian countries where certain neighbourhoods or markets are known as street food hubs, in Japan the stalls selling food are often temporarily installed by shrines or other areas with high foot fall during the holidays.

While many stalls are run by local businesses, some are overseen by yakuza groups, the website reported. ‘Even Tokyo’s Meiji Shrine, which receives the most visitors on New Years in Japan, has shortened our operating hours,’ the boss told Daily Shincho. ‘No one’s around even at eight or nine at night, which are usually the peak hours,’ he complained, noting that business had always been good before the pandemic.        a group of people standing in front of a crowd: This year saw Tokyo's Ueno Park cancel its annual Cherry Blossom Festival - one of the largest cherry blossom viewing events in the country, likely further curbing the numbers of potential customers at yakuza food stalls. Pictured: The Cherry Blossom Festival in Ueno Park in 2013a group of people sitting on a bench: Shortened hours at Tokyo's Meiji Shrine (pictured) has also had a knock on effect on the yakuza, as fewer visitors to the shrine mean fewer customers to their pop-up food stalls at the site [File photo] Shortened hours at Tokyo’s Meiji Shrine (pictured) has also had a knock on effect on the yakuza, as fewer visitors to the shrine mean fewer customers to their pop-up food stalls at the site

This year saw Tokyo’s Ueno Park cancel its annual Cherry Blossom Festival – one of the largest cherry blossom viewing events in the country, likely further curbing the numbers of potential customers at yakuza food stalls. Other yakuza operations have also taken a hit, Soranews24 reported, noting that many of the members are older and so more at risk of catching coronavirus.

As such, some of the groups have suspended end-of-year and New Year gatherings, cancelled drinking parties and avoided in-person work, according to the website.  Last May, Sky News reported that yakuza gangs were engaging in coronavirus-related fraud and raising the street price of drugs to make up for the shortfall in income caused by the pandemic. The centuries-old criminal network reportedly also carried out humanitarian work in an effort to boost its image.  a group of people standing in front of a store: Other yakuza operations have also taken a hit, Soranews24 reported, noting that many of the members are older and so more at risk of catching coronavirus. As such, some of the groups have suspended end-of-year and New Year gatherings, cancelled drinking parties and avoided in-person work, according to the website. Pictured: Gambling parlours like the one pictured are often run by yakuza [Stock photo] Gambling parlours like the one pictured are often run by yakuza

Japan has maintained a remarkably low death rate since the pandemic began last year, given its population size and density.  Infections also remained low which surprised many observers as Japan had avoided lockdowns seen elsewhere. Many Japanese opted to stay at home voluntarily and avoided mixing in large groups without being ordered to, helping to reduce the spread of the virus. The country is currently under a state of emergency following a sharp rise in infections and deaths in December but the restrictions remain significantly looser than those seen elsewhere in the world. Japan recorded 688 new cases on Monday, adding to the 433,000 reported in the country since the pandemic began. A total of 7,940 people have died from Covid-19 in Japan.

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