3,700-year-old Babylonian clay tablet upends history of mathematics

The etchings on the clay tablet pictured above reveal that people have been using geometry in everyday life for centuries longer than many have assumed. The tablet is known as Si.427, and it dates back to the Old Babylonian Period between 1900 and 1600 BCE.  The tablet is basically a land survey that maps out boundary lines, but the surveyor demonstrated a surprising level of knowledge by using what we today call “Pythagorean triples” to make precise right angles. If you paid attention in trigonometry class, you might remember this as the classic 3-4-5 triangle that creates mathematically perfect right … Continue reading 3,700-year-old Babylonian clay tablet upends history of mathematics

Stone Age axe dating back 1.3 million years unearthed in Morocco

Archaeologists in Morocco have announced the discovery of North Africa’s oldest Stone Age hand-axe manufacturing site, dating back 1.3 million years, an international team reported on Wednesday. The find pushes back by hundreds of thousands of years the start date in North Africa of the Acheulian stone tool industry associated with a key human ancestor, Homo erectus, researchers on the team told journalists in Rabat. It was made during excavations at a quarry on the outskirts of the country’s economic capital Casablanca. This “major discovery … contributes to enriching the debate on the emergence of the Acheulian in Africa”, said … Continue reading Stone Age axe dating back 1.3 million years unearthed in Morocco

Sunken city discovered off of Egypt

Divers have discovered rare remains of a military vessel in the ancient sunken city of Thônis-Heracleion — once Egypt’s largest port on the Mediterranean and a funerary complex illustrating the presence of Greek merchants, the country said on Monday, July 19.An archaeologist works at the remains of a military vessel during an underwater archaeological mission in the coastal city of Alexandria, Egypt, on July 19, 2021. The Egyptian-French underwater mission in the coastal city of Alexandria in Egypt has uncovered remains of a military vessel and a funerary complex, according to a statement by the country’s Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities … Continue reading Sunken city discovered off of Egypt

Miners accidentally find huge trove of Mammoth bones

A Canadian mining crew discovered a large collection of mammoth bones while working at a placer mine outside Dawson City, Yukon.Trey Charlie pictured with what appears to be a large mammoth bone. The team were working with an excavator at the Little Flake Mine around two weeks ago when they came across a tusk. Further digging unearthed more and more bones, so the crew decided to pause what they were doing and continue looking for the ancient relics. Trey Charlie, who works at the mine, said he and a co-worker were shocked at how big and heavy the mammoth tusk … Continue reading Miners accidentally find huge trove of Mammoth bones

Rare English coin found after almost 400 years at early Maryland settlement

A silver coin found in Maryland after almost 400 years provided a big clue for archaeologists searching for St. Mary’s Fort one of the earliest English settlements in the New World. The coin, a silver shilling with a portrait of King Charles I, was created by the royal mint in the Tower of London back in England at around the time the fort was settled in 1634, according to Travis Parno, the director of research and collections at the Historic St. Mary’s City museum. “It didn’t exactly have the date printed on it, but it was pretty much the next … Continue reading Rare English coin found after almost 400 years at early Maryland settlement

2,000-year-old marble head of Rome’s first emperor discovered

A 2,000-year-old marble head of Augustus, Rome’s first emperor, has been discovered in Isernia, an Italian town in the south central region of Molise.Archaeologists in central Italy have uncovered a marble head of Augustus Caesar, the first emperor of the Roman empire. Archaeologist Francesco Giancola made the exceptional discovery during restoration works to repair a medieval wall that collapsed due to strong rains in 2013. Giancola was following the works on behalf of the municipality of Isernia, but told CNN Thursday he didn’t expect such a major find. “While we were digging behind the wall, I saw that the earth changed … Continue reading 2,000-year-old marble head of Rome’s first emperor discovered

Child’s burial 78,000 years ago in Kenya was a Homo sapiens milestone

The burial of a young child dubbed “Mtoto” around 78,000 years ago at a cave site in Kenya It is a scene that exudes sadness: a child perhaps 2-1/2 or 3 years old buried in a shallow grave under the sheltered overhang of a cave, head resting on a pillow and the upper part of the body carefully wrapped in a shroud. Scientists said on Wednesday they have found the oldest-known human burial in Africa. The continent that gave rise to our species, dating to about 78,000 years ago at a cave site called Panga ya Saidi near the Kenyan … Continue reading Child’s burial 78,000 years ago in Kenya was a Homo sapiens milestone

Italy unveils plan to furnish the colosseum in Rome

The Italian government has approved a plan to furnish Rome’s ancient Colosseum with a new floor, giving visitors the chance to stand where gladiators once fought. Culture Minister Dario Franceschini announced the project to build the wooden, retractable floor on Sunday. Italian engineering firm Milan Ingegneria won the 18.5m euro (£16.1m; $22.2m) contract to design the floor, the floor is expected to be finished by 2023. At present, the 2,000-year-old monument has no floor. It was removed by archaeologists in the 19th Century, exposing the underground network of tunnels where gladiators and animals were held before the Roman blood sports … Continue reading Italy unveils plan to furnish the colosseum in Rome

Man slept with Civil War ring under pillow

A metal detectorist who discovered a 350-year-old gold and crystal mourning ring in a field on the Isle of Man slept with it under his pillow before reporting it to the authorities. Lee Morgan unearthed the Civil War era piece on an afternoon in late December in the south of the island. He said it was a “fantastic feeling” to unearth the “spectacular” item. The find was reported to the Manx Museum shortly afterwards and declared treasure at an inquest last week. Mr Morgan said he made the discovery with what was his “final signal of the whole year” while out … Continue reading Man slept with Civil War ring under pillow

Gold ring from Civil War era unearthed in field

A gold and crystal mourning ring thought to have connections to the Lord of Man during the English Civil War has been unearthed by a metal detectorist on the Isle of Man. The “delicate” 350-year-old piece was discovered in a field in the south of the island by Lee Morgan in late December. It was revealed in an inquest where it was officially declared treasure. The ring will now go on display in the medieval gallery at the Manx Museum. Manx National Heritage curator Allison Fox said the piece, which is adorned with the letters JD or ID, would have … Continue reading Gold ring from Civil War era unearthed in field

Lost golden city found in Egypt reveals lives of ancient pharaohs

The discovery of a 3,000-year-old city that was lost to the sands of Egypt has been hailed as one of the most important archaeological finds since Tutankhamun’s tomb. Famed Egyptologist Zahi Hawass announced the discovery of the “lost golden city” near Luxor on Thursday. He said the find was the largest ancient city, known as Aten, ever uncovered in Egypt. It was unearthed within weeks of the excavation starting in September 2020. The city dates to the reign of Amenhotep III, one of Egypt’s most powerful pharaohs, who ruled from 1391 to 1353 BC. The city continued to be used … Continue reading Lost golden city found in Egypt reveals lives of ancient pharaohs

Israeli experts announce discovery of new Dead Sea scrolls

Israeli archaeologists on Tuesday announced the discovery of dozens of new Dead Sea Scroll fragments bearing a biblical text found in a desert cave and believed hidden during a Jewish revolt against Rome nearly 1,900 years ago. The fragments of parchment bear lines of Greek text from the books of Zechariah and Nahum and have been radiocarbon dated to the 2nd century AD, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority. They are the first new scrolls found in archaeological excavations in the desert south of Jerusalem in 60 years. The new pieces are believed to belong to a set of parchment … Continue reading Israeli experts announce discovery of new Dead Sea scrolls