Lost golden city found in Egypt reveals lives of ancient pharaohs

The discovery of a 3,000-year-old city that was lost to the sands of Egypt has been hailed as one of the most important archaeological finds since Tutankhamun’s tomb. Famed Egyptologist Zahi Hawass announced the discovery of the “lost golden city” near Luxor on Thursday. He said the find was the largest ancient city, known as Aten, ever uncovered in Egypt. It was unearthed within weeks of the excavation starting in September 2020. The city dates to the reign of Amenhotep III, one of Egypt’s most powerful pharaohs, who ruled from 1391 to 1353 BC. The city continued to be used … Continue reading Lost golden city found in Egypt reveals lives of ancient pharaohs

Israeli experts announce discovery of new Dead Sea scrolls

Israeli archaeologists on Tuesday announced the discovery of dozens of new Dead Sea Scroll fragments bearing a biblical text found in a desert cave and believed hidden during a Jewish revolt against Rome nearly 1,900 years ago. The fragments of parchment bear lines of Greek text from the books of Zechariah and Nahum and have been radiocarbon dated to the 2nd century AD, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority. They are the first new scrolls found in archaeological excavations in the desert south of Jerusalem in 60 years. The new pieces are believed to belong to a set of parchment … Continue reading Israeli experts announce discovery of new Dead Sea scrolls

Ancient Roman chariot unearthed intact near Pompeii

Archaeologists in Italy have unearthed an ancient Roman ceremonial carriage from a villa just outside Pompeii, the city buried in a volcanic eruption in 79 AD. The almost perfectly preserved four-wheeled carriage made of iron, bronze and tin was found near the stables of an ancient villa at Civita Giuliana, some 700 metres (2,297 feet) north of the walls of ancient Pompeii. Massimo Osanna, the outgoing director of the Pompeii archaeological site, said the carriage was the first of its kind discovered in the area, which had so far yielded functional vehicles used for transport and work, but not for … Continue reading Ancient Roman chariot unearthed intact near Pompeii

Builders at Seville bar uncover ’12th Century bathhouse’

Workers renovating a bar in Seville, Spain, have uncovered a well-preserved hammam, or a bathhouse, believed to date back to the 12th Century. The discovery was “completely unexpected” inside the Giralda Bar in the city centre, archaeologist Alvaro Jimenez told AFP news agency. A star-shaped skylight emerged immediately after the workers began hammering the walls of the building. They then uncovered nearly 90 skylights in the roof of the Moorish-style bar. Beautiful Islamic artwork was found on the walls of the room. Experts are crediting an early 20th Century architect, Vicente Traver, saying that it was he who had decided … Continue reading Builders at Seville bar uncover ’12th Century bathhouse’

Viking jewellery found by metal detectorist

A “stunning” collection of 1,000-year-old gold and silver Viking jewellery has been discovered on the Isle of Man by a metal detectorist. Retired police officer Kath Giles made the find on farm land in the north of the island. The hoard includes a gold arm ring and a “massive” silver brooch dating back to 950 AD. It was unearthed in December but has been revealed for the first time during a coroner’s hearing. Manx National Heritage’s curator of archaeology Allison Fox said the arm ring in particular was a “rare find”. Ms Giles said she immediately knew she had found … Continue reading Viking jewellery found by metal detectorist

5000-year-old “industrial-scale” brewery unearthed in Egypt

Archaeologists working in Egypt have uncovered “what is believed to be the oldest high-production brewery in the world,” the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities said Saturday. © Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities whatsapp-image-2021-02-13 East of the Temple of King Narmer in Abydos, the 5000-year-old site was relocated in 2018 using magnetic survey by archeologists from a joint Egyptian-American mission after it had been previously partially discovered and then lost again by British archeologists in the early 20th century.   CBS News contacted Matthew Adams, an archaeologist and research scholar at New York University, who is co-leading the mission that unearthed the brewery, to find … Continue reading 5000-year-old “industrial-scale” brewery unearthed in Egypt

Conch shell found in French cave oldest known seashell instrument

The instrument is thought to be 18,000 years old   A conch shell found during the excavation of a cave with prehistoric wall paintings in France is believed to be the oldest known seashell instrument and it still works. The large shell was discovered in 1931 during the uncovering of the cave in the French Pyrenees, and was assumed to be a ceremonial drinking cup. After sitting in a museum for decades, researchers took a fresh look and determined it had been modified thousands of years ago to become a wind instrument. They invited a French horn player to play it, … Continue reading Conch shell found in French cave oldest known seashell instrument

Stolen ancient coins returned after Italy church confession

More than 200 ancient coins have been returned to a museum in southern Italy by a priest who was told about the theft in confession. The unnamed penitent, presumed to be the thief himself, asked the priest to return the loot to the Paestum archaeological park near Naples, he insisted the coins had to be given personally to the site’s director, Gabriel Zuchtriegel, the park said in a statement. “It’s the latest restitution by someone who feels remorseful” for stealing things, the statement added. Of the 208 coins returned, seven were fake but most of the others date from as … Continue reading Stolen ancient coins returned after Italy church confession

Archaeologists find world’s oldest animal cave painting

Archaeologists have discovered the world’s oldest known animal cave painting in Indonesia – a wild pig – believed to be drawn 45,500 years ago. Painted using dark red ochre pigment, the life-sized picture of the Sulawesi warty pig appears to be part of a narrative scene. The picture was found in the Leang Tedongnge cave in a remote valley on the island of Sulawesi. It provides the earliest evidence of human settlement of the region. “The people who made it were fully modern, they were just like us, they had all of the capacity and the tools to do any … Continue reading Archaeologists find world’s oldest animal cave painting

Tomb of murderous Chinese emperor finally identified

While excavating a mausoleum in Luoyang, China, archaeologists discovered an artifact that may finally confirm that a mysterious tomb belongs to Emperor Liu Zhi (reign A.D. 146-168), also known as Emperor Huan.© Provided by Live Science The mausoleum is located in the city of Luoyang, China, shown here. Archaeologists have known about the mausoleum for many years and have long speculated that it may be that of Liu Zhi, but a seal discovered during the recent excavations may finally prove it. The seal contains the name of Emperor Liu Hong, Liu Zhi’s successor, historical records analyzed by the researchers say Liu … Continue reading Tomb of murderous Chinese emperor finally identified

Neanderthal child’s skeleton buried 41,000 years ago may solve long-standing mystery

A researcher from the Musée d’Archéologie Nationale in France examines material from excavations of the La Ferrassie Neanderthal site in southwestern France. Thousands of bone remains were sorted and 47 new fossil remains belonging to a Neandertal child were identified. Is burying the dead a practice unique to Homo sapiens? Or did other early humans such as Neanderthals lay their loved ones to rest under the earth? It’s a topic of long-standing debate among archaeologists. Now, evidence of funerary behavior could shed light on the cognitive abilities and social customs of Neanderthals and whether, like modern humans, they were capable … Continue reading Neanderthal child’s skeleton buried 41,000 years ago may solve long-standing mystery

Woolly rhino from Ice Age unearthed in Russian Arctic

The remarkably preserved carcass of an Ice Age-era woolly rhino has been unearthed by locals in eastern Siberia, researchers have said, the rhino was revealed by the melting permafrost in the Abyisky region of Yakutia in north-eastern Russia. With most of its internal organs intact, the rhino is among the best-preserved animals ever found in the region, experts will deliver the rhino to a lab for further studies next month. They are waiting for ice roads to form so they can take the remains to the city of Yakutsk, where scientists will take samples and carry out radiocarbon analyses. The … Continue reading Woolly rhino from Ice Age unearthed in Russian Arctic